What’s In a Name?

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Istanbul was Constantinople
Now it’s Istanbul, not Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Oh Constantinople
Now it’s Turkish delight on a moonlit night

Istanbul, as sung by The Four Lads

For fans of pop culture, it’s hard to miss the ubiquitous Victoria Beckham. She seems to be everywhere, from magazine covers to television programs to awards shows. In fact, most of us probably don’t remember that she first came to fame under the name Posh Spice (of the Spice Girls), and before that she was simply Victoria Adams. This kind of personal rebranding isn’t uncommon – celebrities such as Cat Stevens, Chris Evert, and Jennifer Aniston have all changed their names during their careers. And it’s no different in the business world.

Over time, companies and products change names to reflect new developments and market opportunities. Quantum Computer Services became AOL. Blue Ribbon Sports became Nike. Confinity achieved fame (and fortune) as PayPal. Cities, and even countries, do it too. Peking is now known as Beijing, Zaire is the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

And while Rocket Software isn’t exactly the Spice Girls, we’ve also made some tweaks to some of our product names to reflect where we are as a company today. It’s a fairly straightforward process to do it, but in some cases it takes a while for the market (including our loyal customers who have been using the old names for years or even decades) to catch up.

Rocket has made more than 40 acquisitions over the last 15 years, and we now have hundreds of products on the market. In order to simplify everything, we’ve made changes to some of our product names, and are now branding everything under the Rocket badge. We know a lot of folks still use the old names, but those products now incorporate Rocket in their titles or have been folded into Rocket product suites.

In some cases, we’ve added Rocket to the product name, as in Rocket Aldon Lifecycle Manager, Rocket Aldon Harmonizer, and products by Mainstar and OpenTech. In others, we’ve removed the name of the product’s original creator (like Seagull or Trubiquity) and kept the product names under the Rocket brand, as with Rocket LegaSuite, Rocket BlueZone, and Rocket TruFusion.

No matter the name, these are still the same products our customers know and love, with the same engineering teams, the same support teams and – most importantly – the same solutions to critical business and technical problems. Every product in the Rocket portfolio has access to complementary solutions from throughout our offerings to help customers get the most out of their investments.

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David Romo

David Romo

David Romo is a Director of Software Engineering at Rocket Software and has more than 15 years of experience in writing and managing the development of software for the IBM i platform. In his current role, David is responsible for managing the development of Rocket’s ALM solutions.
David Romo

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