Live from SHARE 2017: The Future Mainframe

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One of the definitions of “providence” is “timely preparation for future eventualities.” Perhaps, then, it was fitting that I got to spend the last five days at the SHARE conference in the city of Providence, where one of the main areas of focus was security on mainframe computers. That’s hardly surprising in the wake of IBM’s introduction of the z14, the most powerful and secure mainframe ever built. Not only did I attend sessions featuring experts discussing Big Iron, but I also got to meet dozens of mainframers – all of whom were “all in” on the capabilities that the z14 will bring to the financial services sector.

Here at Rocket, we’ve spent a lot of 2017 talking about the Modern Mainframe, and I am more convinced than ever that these systems are the right choice for organizations that require security, processing power, and flexibility. But I’ve also been thinking about what mainframes will mean to people in 2018, 2019, and for many years to come. And in a world where data breaches are more frequent – not to mention much larger – than ever before, these systems are going to play a key role in keeping sensitive and classified information secure.

There is no single way to protect proprietary data, but recent hacks and ransomware attacks have shown us that encryption at every level is no longer a luxury. Banks, hospitals, government agencies and other organizations that rely on security in order to comply with regulations need to be able to secure their information, and for the first time (thanks to the z14) the processing power and encryption tools exist to meet this need. Over the next few years it’s safe to say that this convergence between security and compute power will continue…and that mainframes will be at the forefront of this movement.

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Jennifer Nelson
Initially a DB2 DBA, I have 18 years experience in the mainframe industry working with DB2 for large mainframe vendors. I have also played the role of a product manager and a product specialist assisting sales with potential and existing customers on DB2 Tools. I hold a BA in Political Science from the University of Texas at Austin.
Jennifer Nelson

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