5 Tips for Working Under Management Unfamiliar with IBM i

Unless you’re working in a very large shop as an administrator on IBM i, you are likely reporting to management that did not come from an IBM i background. This dynamic can be challenging, but there are ways to approach the situation that can lead to a more rewarding experience. Here are a few tips for making this situation work better for you, taken from my own experience. I can’t say I’ve always followed these recommendations, but I can say that things tend to go better when I do.

      1. Be patient – As an IBM i administrator, you’ve spent countless hours learning how these systems work – their strengths, their quirks, and idiosyncrasies. You likely take many of these traits for granted, but it’s important to acknowledge that those who do not have your experience will not. Nor will they necessarily make logical conclusions that you may see as obvious. An example that comes to mind is the many times I’ve been asked by an auditor for the list of database users for our “AS/400.” It may be tempting to tell the requestor, “We haven’t had an AS/400 for over 15 years, and our IBM i doesn’t have a separate database logon for the users!” But that will only make you seem like a curmudgeon. Additionally, if that attitude surfaces frequently enough, management will actively try to avoid you and exclude you from important project discussions that may affect your systems.
      2. Be a teacher – Very little of the opposition you will experience to IBM i is the result of a maniacal plot against the platform. Much of the push back is derived from a lack of understanding of how the systems work and what their benefits are. Taking the time to explain how things work, or better yet, hosting a lunch-and-learn session on an aspect of the system, can go a long way to removing your manager’s and coworkers’ lack of familiarity with the system.
      3. Where possible, reduce your reliance on jargon – There are many terms that may be misunderstood by a non-IBM i person. iASPs, TCP/IP servers, PTFs, and logical files are all things that someone familiar with the platform would understand, but other administrators may not. Wherever possible use language appropriate to the audience. Your manager may not know what a logical file is, but if they have used SQL they will understand what a view is, for instance.
      4. Recommend the right tool for the job – The IBM i platform can perform a multitude of functions, including being an application server, a web server, or even an email server. But what you do with it in your organization should answer to what is right for your business. By recommending solutions involving IBM i only where they make sense, you will foster a reputation as someone who does what is right for your company.
      5. Allow yourself to learn from the administrators of other platforms – Some of the most interesting things I have done with my IBM i systems were derived by learning from Windows, Linux and Unix administrators. For example, we migrate non-production partitions at the SAN level using scripts to capture and recreate the HMC profiles which saves a lot of time. This is a direct result of what I have learned from our non-IBM i staff.